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Everything was better in America [electronic resource] : print culture in the Great Depression / David Welky.

By: Welky, David.
Material type: TextTextSeries: History of communication: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2008Description: 1 online resource (x, 266 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780252092817 (electronic bk.); 0252092813 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): American newspapers -- History -- 20th century | American periodicals -- History -- 20th century | Publishers and publishing -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Buchmarkt | Verlag | Zeitung | Zeitschrift | USA | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / JournalismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Everything was better in America.DDC classification: 071.3/09043 Online resources: Google | EBSCOhost | Table of contents
Contents:
Introduction: "A time not to rock the boat" -- Part One: Newspapers -- The Press encounters the New Deal -- Kidnapping America's child -- Olympic feats of Americanism -- The Gumps: America's comic-strip family -- Part Two: Magazines -- How to slant a magazine -- Life, the war, and everything -- Defining womanhood in the Ladies' Home Journal -- Patriot number one, the man of steel -- Part Three: Books -- Mainstreaming the book industry -- Finding security in best sellers -- Ellery Queen restores order -- Gone with the wind, but not forgotten -- Conclusion: "Everything was better in America."
Summary: As a counterpart to research on the 1930s that has focused on liberal and radical writers calling for social revolution, Welky offers this study of how mainstream culture shaped and disseminated a message affirming conservative middle-class values and assuring its readers that holding to these values would get them through hard times. Through analysis of the era's most popular newspaper stories, magazines, and books, Welky examines how voices both outside and within the media debated the purposes of literature and the meaning of cultural literacy in a mass democracy.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-250) and index.

Introduction: "A time not to rock the boat" -- Part One: Newspapers -- The Press encounters the New Deal -- Kidnapping America's child -- Olympic feats of Americanism -- The Gumps: America's comic-strip family -- Part Two: Magazines -- How to slant a magazine -- Life, the war, and everything -- Defining womanhood in the Ladies' Home Journal -- Patriot number one, the man of steel -- Part Three: Books -- Mainstreaming the book industry -- Finding security in best sellers -- Ellery Queen restores order -- Gone with the wind, but not forgotten -- Conclusion: "Everything was better in America."

Description based on print version record.

As a counterpart to research on the 1930s that has focused on liberal and radical writers calling for social revolution, Welky offers this study of how mainstream culture shaped and disseminated a message affirming conservative middle-class values and assuring its readers that holding to these values would get them through hard times. Through analysis of the era's most popular newspaper stories, magazines, and books, Welky examines how voices both outside and within the media debated the purposes of literature and the meaning of cultural literacy in a mass democracy.

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Other editions of this work

Everything was better in America by Welky, David. ©2008
Everything was better in America by Welky, David. ©2008
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