000 03962cam a2200649Ma 4500
001 ocn181843786
003 OCoLC
005 20140120113440.0
006 m o u
007 cr cn|
008 970710s1998 qucabf ob 001 0 eng d
040 _aCaOONL
_beng
_cMUX
_dLVB
_dOCLCQ
_dE7B
_dOCLCQ
_dCELBN
_dFXR
_dN$T
_dOCLCQ
016 _z979008220
019 _a647570493
_a752542848
_a767734033
020 _a0773515488
020 _a9780773515482
020 _a9780773566491 (electronic bk.)
020 _a077356649X (electronic bk.)
035 _a(OCoLC)181843786
_z(OCoLC)647570493
_z(OCoLC)752542848
_z(OCoLC)767734033
043 _an-cn-ns
045 _av4w7
050 4 _aHC117.N8
_bG89 1998eb
055 1 0 _aHC117 N8
_bG89 1998
072 7 _aBUS
_x022000
_2bisacsh
072 7 _aBUS
_x023000
_2bisacsh
072 7 _aBUS
_x069010
_2bisacsh
072 7 _aPOL
_x023000
_2bisacsh
082 0 4 _a330.9716/02
_221
049 _aISIA
100 1 _aGwyn, Julian,
_d1937-
245 1 0 _aExcessive expectations
_h[electronic resource] :
_bmaritime commerce and the economic development of Nova Scotia, 1740-1870 /
_cJulian Gwyn.
260 _aMontreal [Que.] :
_bMcGill-Queen's University Press,
_cc1998.
300 _a1 online resource (xvi, 291 p., [10] p. of plates) :
_bill., maps.
504 _aIncludes bibliographical references and index.
588 _aDescription based on print version record.
520 1 _a"Julian Gwyn proposes several explanations for Nova Scotia's dismal economic situation. He argues against blaming the merchant capitalists for the relative lack of economic growth, maintaining instead that Nova Scotia's economy was thwarted by numerous disadvantages and very few advantages. For instance, the 1755 deportation of Acadians destroyed a flourishing agriculture for a generation while the limited extent of fertile soil gave rise to widely scattered and discontinuous settlements. Capital from agriculture never accumulated sufficiently to finance manufacturing, mining, commerce, and shipping. As well, Nova Scotia had few natural resources - gold proved expensive to mine, iron ore was soon exhausted, and coal, although abundant, was of poor quality. As a result, Nova Scotia did not have much to trade with Britain and made little profit from belonging to the mercantilist empire. Some areas of the economy, such as trade to the West Indies and shipping and shipbuilding, displayed real growth during the early decades of the nineteenth century. However, Gwyn finds that growth overall was "extensive" rather than "intensive"; that is, it kept pace with population increase but did not exceed it. Thus the growth that took place was actually a form of stagnation and provided no basis for the predictions of a glowing economic future for Nova Scotia."--BOOK JACKET.
651 0 _aNova Scotia
_xCommerce
_xHistory.
651 6 _aNouvelle-�Ecosse
_xConditions �economiques
_yJusqu'�a 1867.
651 6 _aNouvelle-�Ecosse
_xCommerce
_xHistoire.
651 5 _aNova Scotia
_xEconomic conditions
_yTo 1867.
650 0 7 _aSeehandel
_2swd
650 0 7 _aWirtschaftsentwicklung
_2swd
650 0 7 _aGeschichte 1740-1870.
_2swd
651 7 _aNova Scotia
_2swd
650 7 _aBUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economic Conditions
_2bisacsh
650 7 _aBUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economic History
_2bisacsh
650 7 _aBUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economics / Comparative
_2bisacsh
650 7 _aPOLITICAL SCIENCE / Economic Conditions
_2bisacsh
655 4 _aElectronic books.
776 0 8 _iPrint version:
_aGwyn, Julian.
_tExcessive expectations.
_dMontreal ; Buffalo : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1998
_w(DLC) 99208027
856 4 0 _3EBSCOhost
_uhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=404135
938 _aCanadian Electronic Library
_bCELB
_n10135130
938 _aebrary
_bEBRY
_nebr10141797
938 _aEBSCOhost
_bEBSC
_n404135
942 _cEB
994 _a92
_bINISI
999 _c354004
_d354004