000 04111cam a2200673Ia 4500
001 ocm49788594
003 OCoLC
005 20140120114922.0
006 m o u
007 cr cn|
008 020514s1998 maua ob 001 0 eng d
040 _aVVN
_beng
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_dCO3
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_dOCLCQ
019 _a456209396
_a646905154
_a654795014
020 _a9780674029996 (electronic bk.)
020 _a0674029992 (electronic bk.)
020 _z0674465911 (alk. paper)
020 _z9780674465916 (alk. paper)
029 1 _aNZ1
_b11916613
035 _a(OCoLC)49788594
_z(OCoLC)456209396
_z(OCoLC)646905154
_z(OCoLC)654795014
043 _an-us---
050 4 _aHV91
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072 7 _aPOL
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072 7 _aPOL
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_2bisacsh
082 0 4 _a362.7/0973
_221
084 _a15.85
_2bcl
084 _a79.16
_2bcl
049 _aISIA
100 1 _aCrenson, Matthew A.,
_d1943-
245 1 0 _aBuilding the invisible orphanage
_h[electronic resource] :
_ba prehistory of the American welfare system /
_cMatthew A. Crenson.
260 _aCambridge, Mass. :
_bHarvard University Press,
_c1998.
300 _a1 online resource (xii, 383 p.) :
_bill.
504 _aIncludes bibliographical references (p. 333-374) and index.
505 0 _a1. The Decline of the Orphanage and the Invention of Welfare -- 2. The Institutional Inclination -- 3. Two Dimensions of Institutional Change -- 4. Institutional Self-Doubt and Internal Reform -- 5. From Orphanage to Home -- 6. The Orphanage Reaches Outward -- 7. "The Unwalled Institution of the State" -- 8. The Perils of Placing Out -- 9. "The Experiment of Having No Home" -- 10. Mobilizing for Mothers' Pensions -- 11. Religious Wars -- Conclusion: An End to the Orphanage.
520 _aThis book examines the connection between the decline of the orphanage and the rise of welfare. Matthew Crenson argues that the prehistory of the welfare system was played out not on the stage of national politics or class conflict but in the micropolitics of institutional management. New arrangements for child welfare policy emerged gradually as superintendents, visiting agents, and charity officials responded to the difficulties that they encountered in running orphanages or creating systems that served as alternatives to institutional care. Crenson also follows the decades-long debate about the relative merits of family care or institutional care for dependent children. Leaving poor children at home with their mothers emerged as the most generally acceptable alternative to the orphanage, along with an ambitious new conception of social reform. Instead of sheltering vulnerable children in institutions designed to transform them into virtuous citizens, the reformers of the Progressive Era tried to integrate poor children into the larger society, while protecting them from its perils.
588 _aDescription based on print version record.
650 0 _aPublic welfare
_zUnited States
_xHistory.
651 0 _aUnited States
_xSocial policy.
650 0 _aChild welfare
_zUnited States
_xHistory.
650 0 _aWelfare state.
650 0 _aOrphanages
_zUnited States
_xHistory.
650 7 _aPOLITICAL SCIENCE
_xPublic Policy
_xSocial Services & Welfare.
_2bisacsh
650 7 _aPOLITICAL SCIENCE
_xPublic Policy
_xSocial Security.
_2bisacsh
650 1 7 _aWeeshuizen.
_2gtt
650 1 7 _aJeugdhulpverlening.
_2gtt
650 1 7 _aWelzijnszorg.
_2gtt
650 0 7 _aKinderf�ursorge.
_2swd
650 0 7 _aWaisenhaus.
_2swd
650 0 7 _aGeschichte.
_2swd
650 0 7 _aF�ursorge.
_2swd
651 7 _aUSA.
_2swd
648 7 _aGeschichte 1880-1996
_2swd
655 4 _aElectronic books.
776 0 8 _iPrint version:
_aCrenson, Matthew A., 1943-
_tBuilding the invisible orphanage.
_dCambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1998
_w(DLC) 98026789
856 4 0 _3EBSCOhost
_uhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=281897
938 _aebrary
_bEBRY
_nebr5004909
938 _aEBSCOhost
_bEBSC
_n281897
942 _cEB
994 _a92
_bINISI
999 _c407926
_d407926